Adamant Entertainment
DriveThruComics
DriveThruFiction
Adamant Entertainment



Home » Blue Devil Games » Passages » Reviews
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left by this customer:
CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
Publisher: Eden Studios
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 21:38:10
This is less of a review and more of a testimonial.

WitchCraft is the best game ever made. At least, for me.

WitchCraft is, hands down, my favorite game. Period. Picking up a copy of this book back in 1999 was just like picking up a copy of the Monster Manual in 1979. Everything I ever wanted in a game was right there.
Everything.

WitchCraft had such a profound effect on my gaming that I can draw a rather clean line between what came before and what came after it. Granted a lot was going on in 1999/2000 both gamingwise and personal that may have added to the this effect, it was an effect all the same.

Back in 1999 I was really burned out on D&D. I was working on my own Witch netbook and reading a bunch of different games when someone, I forget where, must have been the old RAVENLOFT-L that TSR/WotC used to run, told me I really need to check out WitchCraft. At first I balked. I had tried Vampire a couple years ago and found I didn't like it (and I was very much out of my vampire phase then), but I was coming home from work and the my FLGS was on the way, so I popped in and picked up a copy. This must have been the early spring of 2000.

I can recall sitting in my office reading this book over and over. Everything was so new again, so different. This was the world I had been trying, in vain, to create for D&D but never could. The characters in this book were also all witches, something that pleased me to no end, it was more than just that. Plus look at that fantastic cover art by George Vasilakos. That is one of my most favorite, is not my favorite, cover for a game book. I have it hanging in my game room now.

WitchCraft uses what is now called the "Classic" Unisystem system. So there are 6 basic attributes, some secondary attributes (derived), skills and qualities and drawbacks. Skills and attributes can be mixed and matched to suit a particular need.

WitchCraft uses a Point-Buy Metaphysics magic system, unlike Ghosts of Albion's levels of magic and spells system. Think of each magical effect as a skill that must be learned and you have to learn easier skills before the harder ones first. In D&D for example it is possible to learn Fireball and never have learned Produce Flame. In WitchCraft you could not do that. WitchCraft though is not about throwing around "vulgar magics". WitchCraft is a survival game where the Gifted protect humanity from all sorts of nasty things, from forgotten Pagan gods, to demons, fallen angels and the Mad Gods; Cthulhoid like horrors from beyond. WitchCraft takes nearly everything from horror and puts all together and makes it work.


The Eden Studios version was the Second Edition, I was later to find out. The first one was from Myrmidon Press. I manged to find a copy of that one too and it was like reading the same book, from an alternate universe. I prefer the Eden Edition far more for a number of reasons, but I am still happy to have both editions.

The central idea behind WitchCraft is the same as most other Modern Supernatural Horror games. The world is like ours, but there are dark secrets, magic is real, monsters are real. You know the drill. But WitchCraft is different. There is a Rekoning coming, everyone feels it, but no one knows what it is. Characters then take on the roles of various magic using humans, supernatuals or even mundane humans and they fight the threats. Another conceit of the game (and one I use a lot) is that supernatural occurances are greater now than ever before. Something's coming. (dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria).

It is most often compared to World of Darkness, but there are things WitchCraft does that I just like better. Unlike (old) Mage there is no war between the (good) Mages and the (evil) Technocracy. There is a war certainly, but nothing so cut and dry. Unlike new Mage there are rarely clean divisions between the factions. Yes, yes Mage players, I am being overly simple, but that is the point, on the simple levels new Mage dives everything into 5 because that is how the designers want it. There are factions (Associations) and there are different metaphysics for each, but also overlap, and sometimes no clear and defined lines are to be found or given. It feels very organic.

In my opinion C. J. Carella may be one of the best game designers out there. WitchCraft is a magnum opus that few achieve. I took that game and I ran with it. For 2000 - 2003 it was my game of choice above and beyond anything. The Buffy RPG, built on the Cinematic Unisystem took over till I wrote Ghosts of Albion, which also use the Cinematic Unisystem. I mix and match the systems as I need, but WitchCraft is still my favorite.

WitchCraft paved the way for so many other games for me, not just in terms of playing but in writing. If it were not for WitchCraft then we would not have had Buffy, Angel or Army of Darkness. Conspiracy X would have remained in the it's original system. There would be no Terra Primate or All Flesh Must Be Eaten and certainly there would be no Ghosts of Albion. The game means that much to me.

But you don't have to take my word for it, Eden Studios will let you have it, sans some art, for free.
Download it. If you have never played anything else other than D&D then you OWE it yourself to try this game out.

My thing is I wish it was more popular than it is. I love the game. If I was told I could only play one game for the rest of my life then WitchCraft would be in my top 3 or 2 choices.

You can read more here:
http://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2015/06/why-i-love-r-
pgs-c-j-carellas-witchcraft.html

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
CJ Carrella's WitchCraft
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
Publisher: Malcontent Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 15:40:17
A lot of games take on faerie tales. A lot of games deal with the lands of faerie too. But this is one of the very, very few games that takes place in and about the land of faerie. Seven Leagues is a simple game (mechanics wise) for playing in all sorts of faerie tale situations. I say it is simple, only because the mechanics are. Roll a d12, add or minus appropriate modifiers and get a 13 or better for a success.
There are a few attributes, called Virtures (Hand, Heart and Head) and the rest are like qualities or Charms (in this game), "Strong as a horse", "Tough hide", "can't be hit" and so on. You can play an ogre, a sprite, a magical tree or even a talking animal. You also take a negative "Taboo". Your high concept or class as it were is called an Aspect.
Browsing through this beautiful 126 page pdf I saw influences from Greek myth, Grimm Fairy Tales, folklore from all over Europe and elements they all have in common.
There is a heavy role-playing and story-telling element to this I really like. You are encouraged, by way of your character creation, to get invested in your character.
Honestly this is a great game to teach kids or use it as a primer on how to run a Faerie-based game for any other system.
For the price it is a steal.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Seven Leagues roleplaying game of Faerie
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

LFNE Goodie Bags #2: Baba Yaga's Children
Publisher: FunSizedGames
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 15:07:45
A supplement for the Little Fears Nightmare Edition game. Little Fears has always been one of the games people talk about more than play in my opinion. Though that could just be my experience about not getting to play it as much as I like. This book is 15 pages, but only about 9 of it is content. Don't get me wrong, the art is great and really sets a good tone. Baba Yaga's children are a "Creeper" or a child turned into a monster. The monster in question of course is Baba Yaga.
I love the idea for LFNE, but I REALLY want to try this out in D&D and other games too. The rules of Little Fears are easy enough that conversion is really a breeze.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
LFNE Goodie Bags #2: Baba Yaga's Children
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Folkloric - Baba Yaga, the First Setting in Rassiya
Publisher: Dog Soul Publishing
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 14:21:03
This 67 page book (minus covers, OGL and table of contents) is simply packed full of material for playing Baba Yaga. First we have some background on the witch herself including stats. We are also treated to a number of NPCs that have entered the witch's stories over the years. The book is written for D&D 3.0 edition, but the stats are so few that it could be easily used with any edition, or any game really. And you will want too because there is a lot here. This is book has guides to her hut, the lands that surround it, what happens to those lands and those that come into them. There is even tips on role-playing the witch.
This really is an indispensable guide.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Folkloric - Baba Yaga, the First Setting in Rassiya
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Lost Treasures: Curiosities from the Dancing Hut
Publisher: Pantheon Press
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 09:45:40
This was written for the Fortune's Fool RPG, but is written in such a way that it can be easily adapted to any game. This gave me some great ideas for using the D&D version of Baba Yaga's hut. Plus I also want to check out the Fortune's Fool game as well.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Lost Treasures: Curiosities from the Dancing Hut
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Baba Yaga's Hut
Publisher: Fat Dragon Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 09:37:38
This is not an adventure or a book but a papercraft model. One of the first I have gotten from Fat Dragon.
This was an easy-ish little model to build and it really looks quite nice. I love being able to display this with the minis while we are playing. When we are done with our Baba Yaga adventures then this is going on my shelf with my little witch minis.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Baba Yaga's Hut
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

S5 The Dancing Hut of Baba Yaga (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/30/2015 09:33:40
This is the official/unofficial continuation of the famous S series. I picked this one up because it was about Baba Yaga and my kids have gone through all the S modules now.
This module is for 2nd Ed AD&D and from the earlier days of that system. I "feels" like a late 80s adventure instead of a mid 90s one (1995). I think in part this has to do with it's origins and that the Roger Moore Dragon magazine (March 1984) article about Baba Yaga's hut was still on people's minds at the time.
This adventure is more plot driven than the other S series adventures. Baba Yaga is more of a defined character than say Acererak or Drelnza. In fact she is presented in much of the same manner as Strahd was in Castle Ravenloft. Though there is the assumption that the PCs wont be so stupid as to attack her. Could the right group do it? Sure, but that is not the fun of this adventure. The fun here is investigating her magical hut and finding things that might be unique in your world.
The Hut itself is almost a mini-campaign world, complete with it's own rules of magic and control over the daylight and nighttime hours.
Each level of the hut is designed for different level of characters. It does recall some of the "funhouse" dungeons of the S series in terms of what is being offered but there is some logic applied to most of the rooms. Others unfortunately feel like filler.
It is a fun adventure, but not one that really lives up to the S legacy or the potential of Baba Yaga herself.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
S5 The Dancing Hut of Baba Yaga (2e)
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

The Manse on Murder Hill
Publisher: Taskboy Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/18/2015 16:29:38
The Manse on Murder Hill is a Labyrinth Lord Adventure for character 1st to 3rd level written by Joe Johnston. The PDF is 50 pages which includes 2 title pages, 2 blanks and an OGL page.
Full Disclosure: I received a copy of this pdf in exchange for a fair review.

Ok now that I have that out of the way I also want to add that this is also the exact kind of adventure I would have sought out. Especially these last few weeks. It is "Basic Era" so already I like that and it is a haunted (or so they say!) house. So pretty much I am sold and I have not even gotten past the cover yet.

The art includes work by Stuart Robertson, David Guyll (whom I have been enjoying a lot of his Dungeon World material of late) and Tim Hartin. I want to take a moment to talk about the art. IT is great and really helps set the mood. This module feels different than other "old-school" modules and it is a nice change of pace really. The art and overall feel of the module make this feel more like something you would play with Chill than Labyrinth Lord. Maybe Joe and his team could redo it for something like Cryptworld, Rotworld or Majus. Course the monsters would need to be changed to something else, but it still works.

The adventure itself is for 6-10 characters. I am not sure what the survival ratio is supposed to be, but that seems like a lot. I would rather reduce the party size a bit and have higher levels go. There is a lot going on here, so the larger numbers do work. I think one of the issues some Labyrinth Lords might face is a party "splitting up and searching for clues".

The feeling of this adventure is old school, but old-school+. Like I mentioned above there are modern sensibilities here. Yes, there is a great rumor table (which has a nice XP award system attached), but there is also a backstory to what is going on. The village of Little Flanders feels like something you would have found in a book from a red box, but there are other touches as well.
Characters should feel free to search the village, but keeping in mind that a village is not a dungeon.

The titular Manse itself is not very big. It doesn't have to be really. The place has the requisite eerie feel to it and the table of random "illusions" (I would have called them "hauntings" or "phantasmagorias" but that is me) help. There are also some wandering monsters.

Truthfully I kept picturing #12 Grimmauld Place from the Harry Potter books when I was picturing the Manse. There is plenty of great descriptive detail, but anything more you can add while playing is great. Don't forget the smells and the little noises too.

The module progresses until the goal is discovered, the lost children.

The module is quite flexible. I could not help but think that I could change the monsters to Bogarts and Goblins and have a Faerie-lands sort of adventure. Change them to degenerate humans and suddenly we have a cult to break up. Change them to various types of undead and...well you get the idea.

It should be a perfect rainy-afternoon sort of adventure. Which also happens to be one of my favorite kinds of adventures.

Maybe it can go without saying, but I will say it anyway. This is a very flexible adventure and you can put it into just about any campaign world you want.

Now lets talk about the price. At $2.00 this is criminal steal. Seriously I have very recently paid twice as much for far less adventure than what I got here. This a great adventure.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Manse on Murder Hill
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Better Mousetrap 3e
Publisher: Misfit Studios
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/16/2015 15:24:39
Described as "the most extensive, largest third-party rules supplement for ... Mutants & Masterminds" this book lives up to the hype. At 293 pages (covers, ogl, and toc still leave this at 289 pages of solid content) calling it "supplement" undersells it. Personally I prefer to think of it as "The Villain's Handbook". Everything you need to create a super-villain (not just a villain), their lair, plenty of skills and gadgets and of course powers. There is so much here really.

Chapter 1 covers skills. Plenty of new uses for old skills. Reading it over it seemed obvious that a lot of skill uses for ancient or immortal characters/villains/heroes. So perfect for your Vandal Savage types or old vampires like Dracula. There are some new skills as well. Brainwashing is a nice one. But there are lot of good ones. All in all about 25 pages worth of skills.

Chapter 2 gives us new Advantages. Ace is a nice one but there plenty here, including some Minion Advantages. This is actually really nice. I tend to gloss over minions. Maybe all those years of watching the "Adam West" Batman series. There are also Organization Advantages.

Chapter 3 has all the new Powers. And there are a lot here. There are new Power Effects and new Power Builds. There are also plenty of new Flaws. Needed for bad guys really.

Chapter 4 covers new rules. This chapter is more utilitarian. There are some car chase/combat rules and some mounted combat rules. There are some limited Mecha rules too.

Chapter 5 gets into what I consider the meat of the book and the reason I like it; Making a Better Bad Guy. This is what you need to make your villains into super-villains. Some of this chapter covers the motivation of villains and (the best parts) their evil plans. Some motivations are given ("The World Shall Be Mine!" and "The Voices Told Me to Do It" among others) which discusses why villains do what they do. Motivations are also discussed based on when the villain got their start. For example A Silver Age Villain does things differently than a Golden-Age or Modern-Age Villain.
It is often said that a hero is only as good as their enemies. Well this takes the opposite take, a villain is only as good as their enemies are evil. There is a good section on anti-heroes and even Arch-Enemies. Every hero needs a good arch-enemy.
Several new villain archetypes are presented. Many should be familiar since they pull on some strong archetypes or at least stereotypes, but that is perfect really. Any of these can be filled out to a full blown villain. Once you do that there are plenty of rank and file minions; brutes, troopers, pilots, infiltrators and cyber versions of all of them.

Chapter 6 includes Gadgets and Gear. This includes melee weapons and archaic weapons. Again for our old immortal villains. There are also plenty of guns and vehicles for the minions.

Chapter 7 is the Many Faces of Evil. This covers not just villains, but their organizations.
Chapter 8 covers Headquarters. This covers where those organizations and villains will hide
out. There is quite a lot of material here too.

Chapter 9, Evil to the Utmost, talks about how to use evil and villains. There are even some villains detailed here.

All in all a really good product. If you need to detail your villain and evil organization then this is the book you need.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Better Mousetrap 3e
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Magic8s
Publisher: Composite Games Limited
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/16/2015 12:42:58
Great system for various types of game play.
I hate to use the word "generic" but I mean it in the best possible way.

Various ways magic can be used. Emphasis is given on Fantasy and modern games.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Magic8s
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

The Great City: Castle Ward
Publisher: 0one Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/08/2015 16:46:34
Was looking for a walled castle and this fit the bill. I used it mostly for the maps and really didn't use the NPCs (although they were perfectly fine).

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Great City: Castle Ward
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Amazing Adventures! Companion
Publisher: Troll Lord Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/05/2015 12:01:55
The Amazing Adventures Companion is now out. If you enjoy the Amazing Adventures game (and I do) then this is great news. The book is 162 pages with covers and OGL statement. Beyond that it is packed with all sorts great things.

Book One covers Astounding Action Heroes, or ways to improve your characters or make them closer to your vision. Abilities above 18 are covered and even how to get them there.
Each class is also presented and tips on how to play "other classes" with them. For example The Gadgeteer can be refocused into a street-level, Pulp Age Superhero. Think Batman in his early days. OR take the Gadgeteer and make his gadgets into potions and you have The Alchemist. The Gumshoe can give you an Ace Reporter (something I have really wanted) or the Consulting Detective. Play that aging Sherlock Holmes if you like. No new rules are needed for these since the rules are largely flexible enough. But....if you really want new characters then you are covered here as well. The Companion introduces The Acrobat, The Archer, The Duelist, The Gunslinger, The Pirate and The Soldier. What they do should be fairly self-explanatory.
The next section is one I was really looking forward to reading. This discusses porting over the classes in AA over to a Fantasy game like Castles & Crusades. While there is nothing shocking here it is a good set of guidelines. With the new classes, say like the Alchemist, Archer and Gunslinger it is nice to have so guidelines.
Next we have AA multiclassing, which is a port of the C&C "Class and a half".
We dive into equipment next which includes an expanded firearm list and how to use "classical" armor in an AA game.

Book Two covers Advanced Action Heroes. New rules for your Pulp Character. This includes some new generic class abilities. My new favorites are Occult Library and Wild Talent.

Book Three is Mysteries of Magic, Mentalism and Gadgets. It's like it was written just for me!
More information is given on Magic and Sanity; with caveats of what sort of game are wanting to run. A game where magic is dark can include Sanity and then some spells are removed, others added. We get a few pages of new spells, some tips on adapting C&C spells and then some revised Spell Lists.
For Mentalists we get some new Psionic Powers. For Gadgeteers we get some new gadgets and powers.

Book Four is Astonishing Stories. This covers some basic and advanced rules including contested rolls, Fate points, "Movie Physics", and various issues regarding damage and healing. It's kind of a catch-all chapter, but the overall theme is making your game more cinematic when you want to.

Book Five is Spinning Strange Tales. While it does feature a kickass Snake-headed monk get ready for some kung-fu fighting there is more to this chapter than that. This chapter covers different types of games you can play with AA and what alterations are needed. Most times this is about which classes to include and what equipment to use or not. My favorite might be the "Science Fantasy" section. I mean really, what is more "Pulp Adventures" than Edgar Rice Burroughs? Seriously. Reading this section suddenly I want to give up all my current games and play a Barsoom game using AA/C&C.
Of course I have to mention the section on "Tales of Swords and Sorcery". The author, Jason Vey, has honestly forgotten more about Conan and Robert E. Howard than I'll ever know. He makes some great points about using AA to emulate a Conan style game. Ok. Conan on Mars. That's what I want to play now.

Book Six is our Rouges Gallery. NPCs and Groups. This includes the historical (Harry Houdini) the semi-historical (Robert Locksley) and the comics.

All in all if you are a fan of Amazing Adventures or the Pulp Era in general then this is a must buy!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Amazing Adventures! Companion
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Magnificent Miscellaneum Vol. 4
Publisher: Troll Lord Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/04/2015 16:32:52
These books are a collection of various items for use in C&C by James Michler. Vol 4. has to offer five new artifacts/magic items and 10 new White Box style monsters.
Again not bad for the money.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Magnificent Miscellaneum Vol. 4
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Magnificent Miscellaneum Vol. 3
Publisher: Troll Lord Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/04/2015 16:30:10
These books are a collection of various items for use in C&C. Vol. 3 includes a couple of new artifacts, about a dozen new "White Box" menaces (monsters) and finally (and why I bought it) 3 new druid spells.
Not bad for the price.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Magnificent Miscellaneum Vol. 3
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Castles & Crusades The Giants Wrath
Publisher: Troll Lord Games
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/04/2015 16:25:17
Another Celtic-themed adventure featuring some classic Irish and Welsh monsters and situations. Giants used to populate the lands but now men do. Some of those giants are not happy about it.
This adventure is 26 pages and can be played in a couple of sessions. Be warned though, it is a tough one given that there are a large number of giants to fight. Characters should be strong and the party should include a fair number of fighters and rangers. A wizard would help too.
This adventure also makes for a good bridge (somewhat literally) between the normal fantasy of C&C to the Celtic-fueled darker fantasy of the Codex Celtarum.
Also a good way to introduce the lands of faerie to new players.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Castles & Crusades The Giants Wrath
Click to show product description

Add to Adamant Entertainment Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 744 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
Back
You must be logged in to rate this
0 items
Powered by DrivethruRPG