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Dragon Age RPG, Set 1
by Daniel C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/30/2015 23:42:38
I just finished reading this entire set, and re-reading it over again. I believe this product to be a very solid entry into the fantasy genre. The system is quick and easy, and yet allows for individual thoughts and ideas for your characters and threats (if a GM) to come through with a modicum of change. The game is very well presented and the map of Ferelden is quite good. I must admit that the setting is very good and well fleshed out, but leaving plenty of room for your own "stuff", but I will make this my own, using the system and player options, with additions that I believe will be original to what I envision. This is why a game is just that, made for you. This set gives a wonderful foundation for an infinite number of settings and ideas for gamers to walk through together. Get this now!

Danny

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG, Set 1
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DC ADVENTURES Universe
by John R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/19/2015 12:12:41
A+ My new favorite RPG. I loved DC Comics pre-flashpoint and I've always wanted a superhero RPG. I wish I had learned of Mutants & Masterminds sooner.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DC ADVENTURES Universe
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Dragon Age RPG Core Rulebook
by Maurice E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/01/2015 17:38:26
A while ago I downloaded the quick start rules for Dragon Age and filed it away. Just recently my son and I gave them a try. The rules where quick and fun. The system uses 3D6 with a different colored die called a "dragon" die. Certain rolls result in what's called stunt points that can be spent on special effects during combat. It was a fun twist of play.

I downloaded the core book when it came out not expecting much but was pleasantly surprised with the character creation and game play rules. The book also includes a detailed history and description of the world the characters adventure in. highlights include various organizations that characters can join like secret societies as well as rules to build organizations.

I've never played the video game so I'm not versed as to how closely the table top game follows it. The rules are easy to explain and I see this book as a great addition to any Fantasy genre's fan game nights.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG Core Rulebook
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Advanced Bestiary for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
by Luke M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/17/2015 12:11:55
Exceeded my wildest expectations for monster templates to throw at my players. If you are a GM and need to spice up your sessions encounters, this is the book to do it with. May be the single best 3PP book for Pathfinder for GMs.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Advanced Bestiary for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game
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Blue Rose - The Roleplaying Game of Romantic Fantasy
by Brian P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/08/2015 14:39:39
Blue Rose is subtitled "The Roleplaying Game of Romantic Fantasy." What's romantic fantasy, you ask, and how is it distinct enough from regular fantasy to have its own name? Well, I could easily answer that with "Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar series" and be more than half right, but there are a few more specific commonalities: magic is an innate force that comes from within, tolerance and acceptance of differences are definite virtues, there's a focus on relationships and social contexts instead of tomb-delving and monster-slaying, the villains are frequently either the intolerant or simply the morally monstrous, the world is usually populated by intelligent talking (or psychic) animals and animal-people instead of the standard elves/dwarves/orcs, and community and belonging being depicted as inherently important.

All those are the kind of things I could get behind. I have read almost all of the Valdemar books, after all.

--Setting--

Okay, let me get this out of the way--Blue Rose is pretty much Valdemar as an RPG. The main country of Aldis is Valdemar, with its HeraldsSovereign's Finest traveling the country and righting wrongs, the CompanionsRhy-horses, KyreeRhy-wolves, and other intelligent animals, and the ruler chosen by divine fiat; Jarzon is Karse, including the theocracy in a harsh land that covets the neighboring country's rich lands, the priests burning people who exhibit "unnatural" powers, and the refugees who live just inside Aldis's borders but who are insular and suspicious of Aldis's tolerance for gay people or outre displays of magic; Kern is Hardorn, including the constant invasions of their neighbors, the use of mind-controlledzombified peasants as shock troops in battles, and the rule by a power-mad wizard king; and Rezea is the Shin'a'in, though admittedly here the resemblance is pretty small and mostly about how both the Shin'a'in and the Rezeans are kind of inspired by Native American plains tribes, with some additional Mongol inspiration in the Rezeans' case.

The history is one of the standard fantasy setting backgrounds. In the past was the Old Kingdom, where everyone lived in harmony, magic provided a high quality of life and easy transportation, humanity lived in harmony with the Rhydan (intelligent psychic animals), vatazin, and sea-folk, and everything was totally awesome. At least, it was until unscrupulous adepts delved too much in the mysteries of Sorcery, were corrupted by the power, and overthrew the Old Kingdom with their armies of summoned darkfiends and magically-twisted shadowspawn. These sorcerer-kings instituted a reign of terror and blood, wiping out the vatazin, persecuting the Rhydan, and wasting thousands of lives in petty wars against each other or experiments into the darker aspects of magic. This continued until the remaining rhydan hooked up with some rebels and managed to overthrow most of the sorcerer-kings (except the king of Kern) and re-established their own kingdoms, listed above. What happened to the rest of the world is unknown, and while long-distance communication still exists, long-range travel does not.

One of things I really like are the deities. It's the relatively fantasy-standard idea of elder gods who are more associated with natural processes and younger gods who are more associated with human ideals, but there are several things I really like about this particular implementation. For one thing, even their existance is in doubt. They might answer prayers, they might be behind the Golden Hart that chooses Aldis's ruler, but they might not. There's no proof either way, and that allows for a lot more plausible religious tension than, say, the Forgotten Realms.

For another, the gods actually have relationships. Some of them are married (or dating, or whatever applies to deities) to each other, which shows up all the time in real-world mythology but rarely in fantasy RPG backgrounds. The divine relationships are also where the in-universe terms for gay and straight people--caria daunen and cepia luath, respectively--come from.

(I'm not sure I'd ever use those terms in an actual game, because there's always a tension between immersion from using game-based language and sounding pretentious and silly, but I like that they're there.)

I've seen complaints that Aldis is unrealistically benign, but I think the background supports its ability to be a place people from the real world might actually want to live. For one thing, they can replicate a lot of modern technology using magic, so santitation, communication, psychological care, criminology, and other fields aren't really medieval in mindset, even if the means they use to get there are different--telepaths or telegraphs, you can still send long-distance messages. For another, the background establishes that the ruler may be divinely chosen for their benevolence and purity of heart, and the nobility is an examination-based mandarinate where part of the examination is determining that the candidate is genuinely dedicated to working for the good of Aldis at the moment of the exam (thus leaving the possibility of corruption later). Despite those, there's still veniality, there's still corruption, two rulers have had to be removed due to evil or insanity, people are still poor, etc. There are plenty of opportunities for adventure even if the setting isn't very suited for the typical D&D game of rootless murderhobos, and the assumption that the characters are going to be members of the Sovereign's Finest, with the attendant duties and perks, gives plenty of opportunity to go around righting wrongs.

It's basically fantasy Scandinavia with magic. And honestly, it's more nuanced than the Valdemar novels, so there's that.

--System--

Blue Rose's system is essentially a stripped-down version of D20, and it was actually pulled out and repackaged in a settingless version called True20 for people who liked the mechanics but didn't like or were indifferent to the setting.

Most of the system is pretty much the same as d20 with small or cosmetic tweaks. For example, ability scores are just rated by their bonus (-5 to +5) instead of the raw score, which is honestly a change that they should have done in d20 anyway. Instead of tracking individual coinage, Blue Rose abstracts it all away into a Wealth score that is rolled to acquire new equipment. There's still skill checks, being flat-footed, DCs, rolling 20-sided dice, an action economy (full-round, move, standard, free), savings throws, and most of the other familiar elements of d20. The biggest changes are in the classes, damage and healing, and in the magic system, so I'll deal with each of those in turn.

Rather than the ever-expanding plethora of d20's classes and prestige classes, Blue Rose has only three classes: Warriors, Experts, and Adepts. This is still somewhat problematic--Experts' focus as the class that uses a lot of skills isn't really a good focus in a more skill-based system like d20, and there's no mechanism for Warriors getting multiple attacks beyond feats like Whirlwind Attack--but it's much more open than d20 is. There's also options to dip, like a Warrior taking Wild Talent and being a latent psychic, or an Expert picking up a couple levels of Warrior to represent training in formal dueling.

Attacks and so on are calculated normally, but an entirely new mechanic is used for damage: the Toughness Save. Damage is always 15 plus the appropriate ability score bonus plus the weapon damage, and is opposed by a rolled Toughness Save. Failing the save by variable amounts causes different effects, up to and including jumping straight to bleeding out on the ground for failing by 15+. Lower-level injuries also stack up, so a Wounded character who is Wounded again becomes Disabled. Even the smallest injuries also cause penalties to later Toughness Saves, so everyone will run out of luck eventually.

This is great. It completely undercuts the standard farmer to ubermensch trajectory that D&D characters usually undergo, which is good, because one-man armies work against the communitarian themes of romantic fantasy. It also makes sure that the threats do not need to scale much. A knife in the dark is always dangerous and an enemy army is always a threat, even for high-level characters.

The magic system, called arcana, is entirely feat-based, and as such it is much less unwieldy, less prone to abuse, and impossible to make a CoDzilla. Learning to use one of the six types of magic takes a feat, every two new magic powers takes another feat, and every character gets the same number of feats, so while Adepts probably will be a bit more powerful than Warriors or Experts just by virtue of having supernatural powers, they're unlikely to be able to comepletely outclass them in every possible way because they'll always have weaknesses and blind spots.

Also, magic is fatigue-based instead of Vancian. This is personal preference, but I really don't like Vancian magic and would prefer basically any alternative. Adepts can cast all day long if they're lucky, but three failed Fatigue Checks will knock them out if they don't rest. There are also options to push powers to higher levels in exchange for taking more fatigue. Any power that lets the Adept Take 20 almost always adds 20 to the Fatigue Check, which will almost certainly cause them to fail.

Sorcery--Shadow-aligned arcana--is where the problems with the arcana system come out in force, though. Alignment has never made sense in D&D, and Blue Rose is no exception. Sorcery seems to be similar to the Dark Side of the Force, with a specific note that it comes from negative emotions and a Corruption mechanic in place for its use.

For example, summoning darkfiends is Sorcery, as is erasing someone's memories, or assaulting them with your mind. All makes sense, right? The problem comes in when using Flesh Shaping to alter a transgender person's sex with their permission is Sorcery even though it's entirely beneficial, and the text even calls out this very example in an earlier chapter as something for which the benefit might be worth the cost, so it's not an error (though the actual description does say that such uses may be able to avoid a Corruption check). Furthermore, magically influencing people to do things isn't Sorcery unless it's, "used to cause deliberate harm," but setting someone on fire with your brain or freezing them solid is never Sorcery even though it always causes deliberate harm. Reading someone's inner thoughts is always Sorcery even if you're doing it in a multiple murder trial to determine the accused's guilt.

The main principle seems to be that Sorcery is based on evil intent, except when it's not, which doesn't say...well, anything about anything, really. Whether something is Sorcery or not seems pretty arbitrary to me, except that greater priority is placed on the sanctity or one's mind than one's body, which would be cold comfort to people drowned by adepts using Water Shaping. At least the newly-deceased can be confident that they weren't killed by vile Sorcery.

Other than that minor quibble, I really liked Blue Rose. It's good to see a version of D&D that's both thematically and mechanically focused on social connections, promoting modern values, and finding non-violent solutions to problems when possible, and even if the system is still a bit too d20ish for my liking, it's much more palatable to me with the changes they've made. I may never run this as written, but reading it gave me a ton of ideas for other things.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Blue Rose - The Roleplaying Game of Romantic Fantasy
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Dragon Age RPG Quick Start Guide
by Marcus H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/17/2015 15:01:48
A simple to run system set in a dark and exciting world, with enough stylistic flourishes to keep thing interesting.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG Quick Start Guide
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Dragon Age RPG Quick Start Guide
by Mark M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/23/2015 17:46:09
For a free intro to Dragon Age Tabletop RPG, I thought the Dragon Age RPG Quick Start Guide was excellent. There we're almost no errors, the adventure has enough meat in it to explore most elements of the game mechanics, and the adventure is well-written enough to allow the players a good amount of choice, while being fairly constrained.

It motivated me to purchase the first Dragon Age RPG set.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG Quick Start Guide
by Ray L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/23/2015 12:40:37
very very impressed! Can't wait to try it. interesting system with lots of flexibility and possible use with other games. I much prefer RPG games derived from video games than the other way around.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG, Set 1
by Wesley F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/15/2014 22:12:47
I have played many RPGs but this one hooked me I play every night with my fiancée. The rich history of the world and the leveling paths reminds me so much of video game. Thank you for creating this RPG

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG, Set 1
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Dragon Age RPG, Set 3
by Aled L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/12/2014 13:48:11
A very good product, contains lots of useful new information and a much expanded bestiary.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dragon Age RPG, Set 3
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Woodland Creatures
by Des S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/21/2014 18:44:35
Overall this is a great addition to the Chronicle system.
the title is slightly misleading by simply calling it Woodland Creatures
The book covers mundane Animals through to Beasts (i.e. rarer fantasy type creatures like Giant Spiders and Dire Wolverines)
to Horrors (Barghests and Corspe Callers) and legendary Creatures (hill Giants and The Headless Knight)


All of these creatures are creatures of the woodlands so the title is technically correct but you do get more than some simple Forest animals.

The layout could be better with stat blocks for creatures all crammed up into one page with the descriptions just laid out where they would fit, The book could have benefitted more from A single page per creature with it's own stat block on the same page however as the book is only $5 its pretty hard to fault this design decision.

overall the creatures are unique enough to add interesting gameplay to your games rather than just another pointless mob to throw at PC's some of the Horror's and legends are quite fearsom and could make good adventures simply just trying to track them down and slay them

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Woodland Creatures
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Out of Strife, Prosperity
by James J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/09/2014 09:36:30
This is a great product for "A song of Ice and Fire: Game of Thrones Edition" (2012) RPG by Green Ronin.

This supplement allows you to add a pile of different Wealth Holdings to your own House setup in the RPG. Things like a Mine to generate metals, woods for charcoal, a slaughterhouse to help feed people. A Court or Library for your Keep. Each specific things has a small benefit like +1 wealth, or it gives you a limited sort of protection, from loss of wealth, population, etc.

It also has optional rules for new house actions like sabotage, assassination, spies, secret police to watch your people in your domains, or how to set up a small thieve's guild to skim profits off of it, so that you know what the thieves in your realm are doing, because you are keeping track of them via the guild.

I ended up printing out the 4 main charts on cardstock, and put the rest into a 3 ring binder, for quick reference when the players want to do a House Turn for the RPG. Clearly written, and easy to use.

Easily well worth the cost, for the flavor that this conveys. I'm going to use it to detail the wealth holdings of all the Houses in my SoIaF:GoT game set in the Mountains of the Moon in 285.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Out of Strife, Prosperity
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DC ADVENTURES Hero's Handbook
by Donald F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/08/2014 10:02:25
The familiar d20 elements blend seamlessly with the unique damage system of escalating conditions. Anyone who has played Hero System games will find parallels in the time/distance/power level scale, but more streamlined.
A complete and compact game with enough customization capability to satisfy mechanics-minded GMs and players alike.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
DC ADVENTURES Hero's Handbook
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Night's Watch
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/18/2014 08:30:58
„Ich bin das Feuer, das in der Kälte wärmt, das Licht, das den Morgen bringt…“ – die Militär-Einheit an der Mauer in Westeros besteht aus Verbrechern und glücklosen oder entehrten Adligen. Diesen Männern wird der Schutz des Reiches anvertraut. Wir haben „das Schwarz angelegt“ und wagen die Wacht für Euch.


Die Nachtwache, englisch Night’s Watch, schützt die viele hundert Schritt hohe eisige Mauer im Norden von Westeros. Diese wurde nach der Langen Nacht errichtet und hält Eisdämonen, Untote und die wilden Stämme der Menschen aus dem Norden ab. Einst war die Nachtwache viele Tausend Mann stark und der Stolz des Reiches. Doch Kriege, wechselnde Herrschaftsgeschlechter und die Karge der Landstriche südlich der Mauer haben ihre Zahl schwinden lassen.

Das Quellenbuch zur Nachtwache für das Lied von Eis und Feuer/Game of Thrones-Rollenspiel wirft einen konzentrierten Blick auf sowohl die Wache selbst, aber auch Jene von jenseits der Mauer. Dabei betritt es nichtkanonischen Grund, der aber für eine erfolgreiche Tischrollenspiel-Kampagne dringend nötig ist.

Inhalt
"Die Nacht bricht an und meine Wache beginnt. Sie wird erst mit meinem Tod enden. Ich werde mir keine Frau nehmen, kein Land, keine Familie. Ich werde keine Krone tragen und keinen Ruhm ernten. Ich lebe und sterbe auf meinem Posten. Ich bin das Schwert in der Dunkelheit. Ich bin der Wächter auf den Wällen. Ich bin das Feuer, das in der Kälte wärmt, das Licht, das den Morgen bringt, das Horn, das die Schlafenden weckt, der Schild, der das Reich der Menschen schützt. Ich weihe mein Leben und meine Ehre der Nachtwache, für diese Nacht und allen Nächten, die kommen werden."

Herkunft zählt nicht mehr, wenn man „das Schwarz anlegt“, sich also zur Nachtwache begibt, ein schwarzer Bruder wird. Adlige stehen neben Schwerverbrechen, die die Wahl bekommen haben: Hinrichtung oder Nachtwache. Nach der harten, oftmals nahezu drakonischen, Ausbildung durch unnachgiebige Mentoren sprechen die neuen Rekruten den obigen Schwur. Sie werden einem der drei Äste der Nachtwache zugeteilt, als da sind:

• Grenzer – jene, die ausreiten und die Mauer durchschreiten, um im feindlichen Norden auf Bedrohungen zu reagieren. Krieger durch und durch
• Baumeister – ein Monument wie die Mauer benötigt Wartung, ebenso die Burgen entlang der Mauer. Aber auch schweres Kriegsgerät wie Ballista, Skorpione und Mangoneln wollen gebaut werden
• Kämmerer – eine Militäreinheit wie die Nachtwache kann nicht ohne einen ausgeklügelten verwalterischen Ast funktionieren. Kämmerer sind nicht nur die Burschen der Herren der Festungen, sondern auch Boten, Einkäufer, Verwalter von Grund- und Boden und viel mehr.

Durch den Niedergang der Wache in den letzten Jahren ist nicht nur die Anzahl der Mitglieder geschwunden, sondern auch die Anzahl der Festungen entlang der Mauer. Von den einstigen sechzehn Befestigungen sind nur noch drei intakt und werden bemannt: Castle Black, der Shadow Tower und East Watch by the Sea. Den Romanen folgend sind die Festungen im Quellenbuch eingedeutscht in Schwarze Festung, Schattenturm und Ostwacht an der See.

Auch andere Eigennamen folgen dem Übersetzungskodex der Romane und so müssen Leser der englischen Bücher immer wieder umdenken. Das fällt jedoch nicht allzu schwer.

Apropos Romane – dort sind die Informationen sehr fragmentiert: Hier eine Legende, da eine Person, dort eine Festung. Das Buch schafft es sehr gut, die einzelnen Fragmente zusammenzuführen und gibt einen konzentrierten und auch sprachlich sehr gut aufbereiteten Überblick über die Nachtwache. Das Buch behandelt die Ereignisse zu der Zeit, da Robert Baratheon noch auf dem Eisernen Thron sitzt.

So beschäftigen sich die vollen ersten zwei Kapitel mit der Geschichte, dem wirtschaftlichen Aufbau, der Mauer, den Landen, die einstige Herrscher der Nachtwache zur Verfügung stellten, den Burgherren und bedeutenden Mitgliedern der Wache, und natürlich der speziellen Charaktererschaffung für die Nachtwache.

Während im Grundspiel die Spieler ein eigens erschaffenes Adelshaus steuern, übernimmt in der Nachtwache eine Burg, die wieder bemannt wird, diese Rolle. Das bringt einen interessanten Aspekt ins Spiel, denn hier heißt es vor allem Mängelverwaltung zu betreiben. Die Nachtwache ist nicht sonderlich von Nächstenliebe erfüllt, sondern hat stets das Bestehen der Wache im Gesamten im Sinn wie auch die Erfüllung der Aufgaben. Was passiert, wenn ein Nahrungstransport umgeleitet wird zu einer anderen Festung, aber einige gefangene Wildlinge inhaftiert sind? Solchen alltäglichen Fragen kann sich eine Kampagne zuwenden, hauptsächlich gilt ihr Fokus aber dem Schutz des Reiches vor den Dingen von jenseits des Eismonumentes.

Das Buch wäre nicht komplett, wenn es nicht auch einen Blick jenseits der Mauer werfen würde. Die Menschenstämme, die dort leben, werden von den Westerosi nur abfällig Wildlinge genannt – sie aber nennen sich das Freie Volk. Auch hier gilt für die Zusammenstellung, dass die stark aufgeteilten Informationshäppchen aus den Romanen sehr gut konzentriert werden. Das macht das Quellenbuch auch für Nichtrollenspieler interessant, die einfach nur die Romanserie von G.R.R. Martin mögen.

Jeder Stamm erhält eine eigene Vorstellung und in dieser werden die jeweils einzigartigen Charakteristika gut herausgearbeitet. Als Richtline für SC erfüllen sie somit einen guten Zweck und ermöglichen es, einen Hornfuss von einem Thenn gut zu unterscheiden.

Die Stämme kennen keine feudalistische Kultur, sondern ehren Aufrichtigkeit und Stärke. Das wird an einigen Bräuchen klar – so muss zum Beispiel ein Freier eine Braut regelrecht rauben. Hat er es schlecht gemacht, kann es gut sein, dass er nach der ersten gemeinsamen Nacht nie wieder erwacht, weil sie seine Kehle im Schlaf durchgeschnitten hat.

Neben den Stämmen wird auch die Geographie, sogar mit einer schicken Karte, beschrieben. Siedlungen und besondere Orte erhalten auch eine eigene, teils recht charmant geschriebene, Schilderung.

Während Charaktere der Nachtwache eine eigene Burg erschaffen, erschaffen Spieler von Charakteren des freien Volkes ihren eigenen Stamm. Diese verläuft ähnlich der Erschaffung eines Hauses aus dem Grundregelwerk, verfügt aber im Bereich der Besitztümer schlicht über kleinere Dimensionen. Das freie Volk unterscheidet sich in vielen Belangen von Westerosi, aber vor allem durch den Fakt, dass Frauen die gleiche Kraft und Macht zugestanden wird wie Männern. Das ist auch hier ein Unterschied zum Grundregelwerk. Eine Brienne von Tarth ist selten – eine Speerfrau nicht.

Sowohl bei der Wache als auch beim freien Volk ist die Charaktererschaffung an das jeweilige Umfeld angepasst, was sich in veränderten Tabellen und neuen Vor- und Nachteilen auswirkt.
Sehr schön illustriert sind auch die jeweiligen Beispielcharaktere, mit denen sich sofort losspielen ließe.

Für beide Arten von Spielrunden werden Szenario-Ideen und Abenteuerhäppchen geboten.

Das letzte Kapitel verlässt den offiziellen Kanon und weist auch korrekterweise darauf hin. Der eigentliche Feind jenseits der Mauer sind nicht die Wildlinge, es sind die Dämonen aus dem Eis. Um jene abzuhalten, wurde einst die Mauer errichtet. Nun scheint es, als ob eine neue lange Nacht anbrechen könnte und die Schrecken erheben sich erneut.

Von einigen Legenden haben Romanleser schon gehört, so zum Beispiel vom Winterkönig. Jener war einst ein Mitglied der Wache. Er nahm sich eine von den Anderen, so die nur ängstlich geflüsterte Bezeichnung für den Feind, zur Braut und hatte vor, die gesamte Nachwache zu unterwerfen. Nur mit vereinten Kräften konnte er gestoppt werden.

Was macht nun eigentlich einen Winter so schrecklich, in einer Welt, in der Heere aus zehntausenden Soldaten bestehen? Auf Westeros vergehen die Jahreszeiten langsamer – ein Kind kann im Frühling geboren werden und wird im Sommer erwachsen. Winter in Westeros gleichen Eiszeiten, die fünfzehn oder mehr Jahre andauern…

Mit dieser Kälte kommen die Anderen und ihre Fußtruppen, ruhelose Tote. Im nur wenige Seiten umfassenden letzten Abschnitt finden sich weitere Legenden, Ideen für die Handlung von Spielabenden und natürlich auch Werte. Und diese haben es fürwahr in sich – alleine die Sonderfertigkeiten der Anderen sind mehr als gefährlich.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis

29,95 EUR mag viel erscheinen, wenn man bedenkt, dass der Quellenband nur 148 Seiten, inklusive Index, umfasst. Dennoch ist der Band durch den Inhalt, hier in Form des konzentrierten Wissens um die Wache und das freie Volk, herausragend gestaltet. Auch optisch spricht er an. Die vielen Abenteuerideen lassen sich unschwer in bestehende Kampagnen einflechten. Sie finden sicher auch Anwendung in einer Kampagne, die sich um die nördlichen Lehen rund um das von Haus Stark zentriert.


Fazit
Das Quellenbuch rund um die Nachtwache und den eisigen Norden von Westeros hat mir viel Freude bereitet. Mag es daran liegen, dass ich gerade, getrieben vom Kielwasser der Serie, die Bücher lese oder die Informationen generell einfach gut aufgebaut sind. Leser erhalten nach der Lektüre einfach ein wirkliches Gefühl für die Struktur, das Ambiente und die Aufgaben der Grenzeinheit.

Es gelingt der Übersetzung auch gut, die jeweiligen Stimmungen von der Grenzwacht auf der einen Seite und der Freiheit der Wildlinge auf der anderen Seite zu präsentieren. Desweiteren zeigt der Band einen guten Weg, wie man im Game of Thrones-Rollenspiel auch einfach etwas anderes als nur höfische Intrigen spielen kann. Damit gewinnt das Spiel deutlich, denn die verschiedenen Schattierungen des Ortes der Handlung werden damit klarer.

Auch innerhalb der Wache zeigt sich diese Diversität. Militärisch orientierte Spieler, die viel Action wollen, werden mit Grenzern im Kampf gegen Untote und Wildlinge ihre wahre Freude haben. Spieler, die eher Wert auf Interaktion und Politik legen, werden mit den Kämmerern genug zu tun haben. Soll das Spiel sich einmal ganz anders anfühlen, spielt die Runde die Teile eines Wildingstammes, der ums tägliche Überleben kämpfen muss und dabei weder Winter, noch Untoten noch anderen Stämme fürchtet.

Fans der Welt und des Spieles rate ich uneingeschränkt zum Kauf, denn ich fand keine Mankos. Für Romanleser sind gute zwei Drittel des Buches eine gute Zusammenfassung, Spieler können alles benutzen.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Night's Watch
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The Freeport Trilogy Five Year Anniversary Edition
by David L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/14/2014 20:49:56
There is a lot of good setting and background information here, but the adventure series ignores this to go with the cliché "mad cultists running amok". The back story of the serpent people is incredibly interesting, but they are used as generic antagonists. The npc who goes missing and starts the whole thing off has an interesting (Lovecraft stolen) back story that is entirely ignored. The pirate setting is mostly ignored. This is not to say the adventure is written badly it is just an exceedingly generic adventure set in an interesting city.

The adventure also does not make the best use of its page count. At times it seems like the writer is blatantly including extraneous information to pad out the length and fit a certain page count. There is a very minor npc that only has a couple of lines and is killed off screen, but a half page sidebar is used to detail his entire life story. At another point an entire new class (cultist) is created and assigned to some low level unnamed npcs. Tellingly the class is never used again even though most of the villains in the adventure are cultists. At another point 13 pages are used to give way more information about the various NPCs at a party then would ever be needed even if one were LARPing the party. All of this means that this 120+ page adventure has less real actual content then a lot of 64 page adventures.

Again this is not a bad adventure, instead it is a mediocre adventure with an undeserved reputation and a padded page count.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Freeport Trilogy Five Year Anniversary Edition
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